DMARC

Learn more about DMARC

We see that you have a DMARC record in place, with a policy of p=quarantine. While you are you are actively protecting your domain, you may want to consider moving to a reject policy. DMARC reports are currently being sent to jakzmdcn@ag.dmarcian.com and dmarc@litmus.com.

DMARC Details

Check Result
Test Result Critical
Test Status SPF and DKIM Alignment Failed
DMARC Record v=DMARC1; p=quarantine; pct=100; rua=mailto:jakzmdcn@ag.dmarcian.com; ruf=mailto:dmarc@litmus.com; sp=none; aspf=r;
Version v=DMARC1
Policy p=quarantine
Sample Rate pct=100
Aggregate Reporting Address rua=mailto:jakzmdcn@ag.dmarcian.com
Forensic Reporting Address ruf=mailto:dmarc@litmus.com
Subdomain Policy sp=none
SPF Alignment aspf=r
Sender Domain litmus.com
DKIM Domain mail144.atl221.rsgsv.net
Envelope Domain mail144.atl221.rsgsv.net
DMARC Policy Domain _dmarc.litmus.com

External Validation

Status Email Provider
AOL Mail
Gmail

Overview

DomainKeys Identified Mail, or DKIM, allows your organization to claim responsibility for your email as part of the authentication process. It plays a role in how an Internet Service Provider, or ISP, knows it's really you that's sending your email.

Technically, this means that DKIM validates a domain name identity through cryptographic authentication added to a DNS record. DKIM also allows a sender to identify a domain to be used by receivers to assign a sender reputation. Signing your email using DKIM is a recommended best practice industry-wide, and one of the key ways to ensure Inbox providers develop your domain's sender reputation profile.

Basically, DKIM shows that your email is associated with your domain.

How can we help?

Litmus validates that the DKIM record in your domain's DNS zone is properly implemented and meets current specifications.

Litmus also reports external authentication results from multiple Inbox providers, to aide in troubleshooting of intermittent issues in DNS or your sending infrastructure.

Take Action

  1. Check your Email Service Provider (ESP) for their DKIM guide. Your ESP will either sign the message for you or provide specific instructions to correctly enter the DKIM entry into your domain's DNS zone.

Learn More

Other aspects of authentication include Sender Policy Framework (SPF) and Domain-Based Message Authentication, Reporting, and Conformance (DMARC).

Overview

DMARC stands for Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting, and Conformance. It serves as a method of authentication for your brand, alongside Sender Policy Framework (SPF) and DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM). What sets DMARC apart from the other two authentication methods is its reporting capability.

DMARC is an email authentication technology that protects a domain from being used in phishing and spoofing attempts by using a signing policy to define how receiving inbox providers should handle messages that fail an authentication check. DMARC also allows for a reporting mechanism in which inbox providers can send reports on email that appears to be sent from a certain domain back to the domain owner.

Inbox providers that support DMARC will attempt to validate both DKIM and SPF, and depending on the outcome of those checks, will look to the sending domain's DMARC policy on how to handle emails that fail authentication.

If the inbox provider is able to successfully validate either DKIM or SPF, the email will continue on its normal path. If the message fails both DKIM and SPF authentication checks, however, the inbox provider will enforce the sender’s DMARC policy, which specifies how the email should be handled if it fails authentication and where to send any reports.

DMARC has three levels of policy:

  • None: If the policy is set to none, the receiving inbox provider monitors and reports on metrics.
  • Quarantine: If the DMARC policy is set to quarantine, the inbox provider places messages that fail the required checks into the user's spam folder.
  • Reject: If the policy is set to reject, the inbox provider will block any message that fails authentication.

The preferred policy type—once vetted for correct implementation—is 'p=none' which provides the highest level of protection.

How can we help?

Litmus validates that the DMARC record in your DNS meets the required specifications. Litmus also reports the results of the record from multiple external inbox providers to help you troubleshoot intermittent issues.

Take Action

1. Check your Email Service Provider (ESP) for their DMARC guide.

Your ESP may have detailed instructions for adding the correct DMARC entry as a text entry in your domain's DNS record. Given the impact an incorrect DMARC policy can have, you should consult with your ESP if you are unsure how to proceed.

Learn more

Overview

List-unsubscribe is an optional email header that extends functionality of the unsubscribe process.

Many inbox providers look for this header and display an unsubscribe button, allowing an easy and consistent unsubscribe action. This indicates that a subscriber requests to be removed from your email list.

How can we help?

Litmus validates the List-Unsubscribe header record in your email, and checks it meets the right specifications.

Take Action

While it can be tempting to focus on reducing the number of unsubscribes as a metric of success, unsubscribes can be a good thing. Our research has shown that 50% of consumers marked email as spam because they couldn’t easily figure out how to unsubscribe. Keep these tips in mind when creating opt-out processes for your email marketing campaigns:

1. Implement the list-unsubscribe header in all of your marketing emails

If you're unsure how, check with your Email Service Provider, or review the specification.

2. Include a prominent unsubscribe link in every promotional email. This is a great best practice, but it's also required for any email sender to comply with international spam regulations. Here's an example of what Litmus' footers look like, if you're in need of inspiration:

3. Use an unsubscribe process that requires no more than one step. Aim for a single click from the email, and one additional click in the unsubscribe page or your preference center.

4. Ensure that unsubscribe pages and preference centers are accessible without requiring a login.

Learn More

Overview

Sender Policy Framework, or SPF, is mechanism that allows a domain owner to indicate multiple IP addresses or domains that can send mail on their behalf via a DNS TXT entry.
It protects the envelope sender address (known as the return path) by comparing the sending mail server's IP address to their master list of authorized sending IP addresses in a particular DNS record.

How can we help?

Litmus validates that the SPF record added to your DNS is properly implemented and meets specifications.

For each test that you send, we report SPF authentication results from multiple inbox providers, to troubleshoot any intermittent issues.

Take Action

1. Check your Email Service Provider (ESP)'s guide on SPF

Your ESP should be able to provide the text to create an SPF entry in your domain's DNS record. They may have already set up an SPF record for your domain. Otherwise, this will need to be handled by your DNS administrator or IT department.

2. Review common mistakes. OpenSPF has a detailed guide on common mistakes.

Learn more: guide on common mistakes with SPF.

Learn More

Other aspects of authentication include DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) and Domain-Based Message Authentication, Reporting, and Conformance (DMARC).
Other deliverability resources:

Overview

STARTTLS, otherwise known as Opportunistic TLS, gives senders the ability to encrypt email in transit. Emails sent to an inbox provider that can handle messages over TLS (e.g. Gmail, Microsoft) will be sent using the secure TLS encryption. If the receiving inbox provider doesn't support TLS, the sending server will instead send the email as normal.

How can we help?

Litmus validates your inbound email, indicating whether it was sent using opportunistic TLS.

While not yet a requirement for delivery, many inbox providers support TLS and display this status to users. For example, Google uses a red or green padlock icon in the email to show users whether or not the email is encrypted with TLS.
Litmus recommends you enable opportunistic TLS if it is supported by you or your Email Service Provider (ESP)'s systems.

Take Action

1. Check if opportunistic TLS is enabled. If your message is not being encrypted, your ESP should enable opportunistic TLS for you.

Learn More

1. Google reports on the proportion of email sent, providers supporting TLS, and a easy to understand FAQ:

Other Deliverability Resources:

Overview

List-unsubscribe is an optional email header that extends functionality of the unsubscribe process.

Many inbox providers look for this header and display an unsubscribe button, allowing an easy and consistent unsubscribe action. This indicates that a subscriber requests to be removed from your email list.

How can we help?

Litmus validates the List-Unsubscribe header record in your email, and checks it meets the right specifications.

Take Action

While it can be tempting to focus on reducing the number of unsubscribes as a metric of success, unsubscribes can be a good thing. Our research has shown that 50% of consumers marked email as spam because they couldn’t easily figure out how to unsubscribe. Keep these tips in mind when creating opt-out processes for your email marketing campaigns:

1. Implement the list-unsubscribe header in all of your marketing emails

If you're unsure how, check with your Email Service Provider, or review the specification.

2. Include a prominent unsubscribe link in every promotional email. This is a great best practice, but it's also required for any email sender to comply with international spam regulations. Here's an example of what Litmus' footers look like, if you're in need of inspiration: inspiration:

3. Use an unsubscribe process that requires no more than one step. Aim for a single click from the email, and one additional click in the unsubscribe page or your preference center.

4. Ensure that unsubscribe pages and preference centers are accessible without requiring a login.

Learn More

Overview

Sender Policy Framework, or SPF, is mechanism that allows a domain owner to indicate multiple IP addresses or domains that can send mail on their behalf via a DNS TXT entry.
It protects the envelope sender address (known as the return path) by comparing the sending mail server's IP address to their master list of authorized sending IP addresses in a particular DNS record.

How can we help?

Litmus validates that the SPF record added to your DNS is properly implemented and meets specifications.

For each test that you send, we report SPF authentication results from multiple inbox providers, to troubleshoot any intermittent issues.

Take Action

1. Check your Email Service Provider (ESP)'s guide on SPF

Your ESP should be able to provide the text to create an SPF entry in your domain's DNS record. They may have already set up an SPF record for your domain. Otherwise, this will need to be handled by your DNS administrator or IT department.

2. Review common mistakes. OpenSPF has a detailed guide on common mistakes.

Learn more: guide on common mistakes with SPF.

Learn More

Other aspects of authentication include DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) and Domain-Based Message Authentication, Reporting, and Conformance (DMARC).
Other deliverability resources:

Overview

STARTTLS, otherwise known as Opportunistic TLS, gives senders the ability to encrypt email in transit. Emails sent to an inbox provider that can handle messages over TLS (e.g. Gmail, Microsoft) will be sent using the secure TLS encryption. If the receiving inbox provider doesn't support TLS, the sending server will instead send the email as normal.

How can we help?

Litmus validates your inbound email, indicating whether it was sent using opportunistic TLS.

While not yet a requirement for delivery, many inbox providers support TLS and display this status to users. For example, Google uses a red or green padlock icon in the email to show users whether or not the email is encrypted with TLS.
Litmus recommends you enable opportunistic TLS if it is supported by you or your Email Service Provider (ESP)'s systems.

Take Action

1. Check if opportunistic TLS is enabled. If your message is not being encrypted, your ESP should enable opportunistic TLS for you.

Learn More

1. Google reports on the proportion of email sent, providers supporting TLS, and a easy to understand FAQ:

Other Deliverability Resources:

Overview

A domain blocklist (DBL) is a real-time collection of sending domains that could indicate spam or other types of email abuse.

Domain blocklists are more commonly known as blacklists. Blacklists may utilize a combination of spam traps, spam complaints, and other proprietary data sources as criteria for adding a domain to a blocklist.

Inbox providers maintain internal blocklists, as well as use third-party blacklists as independent data sources.

How can we help?

Litmus scans your domain against various blacklists and will indicate whether or not your domain is listed at time of send.

Not all blacklists carry the same level of trustworthiness or adoption. Litmus will alert you based on the level of importance or potential impact.

Impact

The impact a blacklist or blocklist has on your email delivery can vary depending on the list. To help you prioritize your efforts, we’ve included an impact flag, which indicates how damaging a listing could be for your email delivery.

A high impact listing indicates a widely used blacklist or blocklist that will cause your email to be blocked at one or more major email providers. A low impact listing, by contrast, may impact your overall email delivery, but most likely on a lower scale.

Take Action

If you find your domain on a blocklist, the most common reason is a bad source of data, user complaints or hitting a spam trap.

Learn More

1. Avoid spam traps.Spam traps are commonly used by blacklist providers to catch malicious senders, but often, legitimate senders with poor data hygiene or acquisition practices get caught in a spam trap. Learn more:

2. Check out these other deliverability resources:

Overview

Barracuda Essentials for Email Security is a sophisticated anti-spam and email analysis tool often used by large organizations.

Barracuda analyzes each email message, assigning a score between 0 and 10 to indicate if the email is likely to be spam. You should aim for a score below 5.0.

If you receive a score higher than 5.0 from Barracuda (meaning, your email is determined to be spam), Barracuda quarantines and blocks the email.

Take Action

Spam filters and inbox providers like Barracuda don’t always reveal much about how they rank and classify spam. Here are some actions you can take if you’re caught in Barracuda’s spam filter:

1. Check the reputation of your IPs and domains

2. If you are listed, you can request removal here:

3. Learn more about Barracuda with Barracuda Essentials

4. Take a look at Barracuda’s Documentation:

5. You can request access to Barracuda’s reputation block list.

Learn More

1. Keep good list hygiene by ensuring you mail to only active and engaged subscribers. Learn more:

2. Understand why your content could be spammier than you think. The easiest way to control how your email is dealt with by spam filters is how you develop your content. Learn more:

3. Adapt to consumers' new definition of spam. Consumers now unsubscribe and mark a brand's emails as spam for the same reasons. Learn more:

Overview

Microsoft Exchange Online Protection uses a built-in malware and spam filter to evaluate and score email. Your email receives a spam confidence level (SCL) score between -1 and 9. A score of 5 or higher is considered spam. Litmus uses the default setting to determining the scores of your email

Take Action

1. Check out Microsoft's scoring breakdown and how they are applied to troubleshoot any spam issues you’re having with your email. Learn more:

2. For Bulk Complain Level (BCL), your email receives a score between 0 and 9. The higher the score, the more likely Microsoft believes you are going to generate subscriber complaints. Microsoft uses internal and external sources to determine this score. Learn more:

3. Microsoft assigns several anti-spam header reports into each email after scanning. To find out what these headers mean (and troubleshoot your email) check out:

Learn More

1. Microsoft Exchange Online Protection provides some useful information about how they rank spam:

2. Understand why your content could be spammier than you think. The easiest way to control how your email is dealt with by spam filters is how you develop your content. Learn more:

3. Adapt to consumers. new definition of spam. Consumers now unsubscribe and mark a brand’s emails as spam for the same reasons, and consumers’ definition of spam now involves experiences that go well beyond the inbox. Learn more:

Overview

Symantec Message Labs is an anti-virus and spam analysis tool, used by organizations to protect corporate email. Symantec operates similarly to other spam filters by analyzing email and assigning a score to indicate if the email is likely to be spam.

Take Action

1. Review information on error codes Symantec responds with

2. Check your IP reputation:

Learn More

Spam filters like Symantec don't reveal too much about how they rank spam. However, here are some best practices to avoid email being considered spam:

1. Understand why your content could be spammier than you think. The easiest way to control how your email is dealt with by spam filters is how you develop your content. Learn more:

2. Adapt to consumers' new definition of spam. Consumers now unsubscribe and mark a brand's emails as spam for the same reasons, and consumers' definition of spam now involves experiences that go well beyond the inbox. Learn more:

Overview

Outlook comes with a built-in junk email filter that learns over time what you think is spam. While this is great for individual users, it's not consistent nor reliable for use across thousands of tests on our Litmus servers. To help you reliably test your messages sent to Outlook, we've added in hundreds of spam rules that have been published by Microsoft.

This filter has various sensitivity settings so you can adjust your level of junk email protection. We have chosen 'High' as the default for all of your Litmus tests. The Microsoft Outlook filter scores from 0-10 on the high sensitivity rating, with 0 being the highest (passing) and 10 being the lowest (failing). Outlook rates an email with a 6.0 or higher as a failure. Anything lower than 6.0 is considered a passing score with the high sensitivity rating.

Take Action

Whenever the content in your message triggers one of the spam rules we've added, we'll provide you with feedback on what can be changed to make your email look less "spammy" to Outlook.

Learn More

Here are some best practices to avoid email being considered spam.

1. Understand why your content could be spammier than you think. The easiest way to control how your email is dealt with by spam filters is how you develop your content. Learn more:

2. Adapt to consumers' new definition of spam. Consumers now unsubscribe and mark a brand’s emails as spam for the same reasons, and consumers' definition of spam now involves experiences that go well beyond the inbox. Learn more:

SpamAssassin – Help

SpamAssassin is a popular open source spam filter used by organizations. SpamAssassin analyzes email headers and body text by using text analysis, bayesian filtering, DNS blocklists, and collaborative filtering databases. It then assigns your email a score to determine whether it is spam. Anything spam-like adds points, while following recommended best practices and regulations in your email reduces your score.

Generally, your email should have a score of 5.0 or lower to pass. The lower your score, the less likely your email will flag common spam filtering rules.

Litmus tests against SpamAssassin version 3.3 with default settings.

Take Action

1. Analyze error codes. If your email fails a SpamAssassin test, we’ll provide feedback on the reason so you can attempt to fix the issue. Here’s a full list of the tests we run:

Learn More

1. You can find more information about the SpamAssassin platform here:

2. Adhere to list hygiene best practices. Ensure you are mailing to only active and engaged subscribers. Learn more:

3. Avoid spam traps. Spam traps are commonly used by Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and blacklist providers to catch malicious senders, but quite often, legitimate senders with poor data hygiene or acquisition practices end up being marked asp spam. Learn more:

4. Adapt to consumers' new definition of spam. Consumers now unsubscribe and mark a brand’s emails as spam for the same reasons, and consumers’ definition of spam now involves experiences that go well beyond the inbox. Learn more:

Overview

Outlook.com (formerly known as Hotmail) is Microsoft's webmail service. Users may still use their existing @hotmail.com addresses.

Outlook.com uses proprietary spam filters in combination with spam complaints and a panel of trusted users to determine filtering decisions.

Take Action

1. Microsoft provides a good troubleshooting guide. Learn more:

2. Improve your sender reputation at Outlook.com. Learn more:

3. Microsoft offers additional services to help you troubleshoot your deliverability with Outlook.com:

Learn More

Overview

G Suite, formerly Google Apps, is a collection of intelligent, cloud-based apps from Google for businesses. The apps include an ad-free, professional version of Gmail for email, so the spam analysis for G Suite is very similar to the Gmail inbox. Like Gmail, G Suite largely relies on a community-driven spam filter. G Suite provides several options for users to customize their spam filters as well.

Take Action

To help your message avoid being labeled as spam in G Suite, you can take several actions:

1. Make sure you're following the Bulk Sender Guidelines. Learn more:

2. Check to see your spam complaints using Gmail's Postmaster Tools. Learn more:

3. Troubleshoot other Gmail-related deliverability issues. Learn more:

Learn More

For more information on how G Suite handles spam, check out:

Overview

Launched in October 2014, Inbox by Gmail is a separate email app from Gmail. Like Gmail, it’s free, but it offers a few different features, including bundles for organization, a more visual inbox, and reminders management. Check out our blog post on some of the updated features.

Like Gmail, Inbox by Gmail relies on the same community-driven spam filter for analyzing messages. But unlike most Internet Service Providers (ISPs), Inbox by Gmail does not offer a traditional form of feedback loop for senders. If you're used to working with ISPs and inbox providers on deliverability issues, you may find this frustrating, but the good news is that Google does have some helpful guidelines.

Inbox by Gmail automatically groups emails into categories called Bundles. There are standard Bundles, but users can also create their own and determine how often to show the Bundles. It's important to know that if your email goes into the Promo, Purchases, or Updates Bundle, it's not the same thing as landing in spam. We'll show you which Bundle you end up in so you can keep tabs on your subscriber experience.

Take Action

To help your message avoid the spam folder, you can take several actions:

  1. Make sure you’re following the Bulk Sender Guidelines.
  2. Check to see your spam complaints using Gmail's Postmaster Tools.
  3. Troubleshoot with Gmail.

Learn More

Here are some additional links you may find helpful:

Overview

GMX and WEB.DE are email clients of United Internet AG, one of Germany's leading Internet Service Provider (ISPs). Both include a freemail (ad-supported) and paid options for larger email needs.

You can find out more about these email clients here:

Nearly 54% of emails in Germany are opened in GMX or WEB.DE. If you're based in Germany, Austria, or Switzerland or you're mailing to subscribers based in those countries, then you'll definitely want to find out if your email is reaching the inbox.

Take Action

If your email is landing in spam, there are several things you can check. 1. Check the explanations of error messages to find out the specific reasons your email is being sent to the spam folder. You can find the explanations here:

2. Ensure you are complying with the sending policy and best practices. You can find these here:

3. Participate in the Certified Senders Alliance to help improve delivery and lower your chances of landing in the inbox.

Learn more

Here are some additional links you may find helpful:

GMX

Web.de

Overview

Gmail is Google's free email service that's been around since February 2007. Most users access Gmail as secure webmail, but there are apps for popular mobile platforms like iOS and Android as well.
Gmail largely relies on a community-driven spam filter for analyzing messages. But unlike most Internet Service Providers (ISPs), Gmail does not offer a traditional form of feedback loop for senders. If you're used to working with ISPs and inbox providers on deliverability issues, you may find this frustrating, but the good news is that Google does have some helpful guidelines you can find here:

Gmail also automatically sorts emails into one of the following five tabs: Primary, Social, Promotions, Updates, and Forums. Users can further customize tabs and define rules for sorting emails from particular senders. Similar to the way it filters spam, Google takes into account how users categorize emails and uses that information when determining how to filter future emails. It is important to note that if your email lands in the Promotions section, it is not the same thing as landing in Spam.

Take Action

To help your message avoid the spam folder, you can take several actions:

1. Make sure you're following the Bulk Sender Guidelines. Learn more:

2. Check to see your spam complaints using Gmail's Postmaster Tools. Learn more:

3. Troubleshoot other issues. Learn more:

Learn More

Overview

Yandex is a Russian-based internet company that operates the largest search engine in the country. Like Google, they also offer a free email service. Yandex uses its own proprietary anti-spam technology to filter out suspicious emails based on bulk sending, spam features in the email, and community feedback. Users can also set personal filtration rules that could cause your message to be marked as spam by one user, but not by another.

Take Action

To help your message avoid the spam folder, you can take several actions:
1. Make sure you're following Yandex requirements for honest mailing lists. Learn more:

2. Report any emails you believe are being mistaken as spam to Yandex.Mail Support through the feedback form.

Learn More

Here are some additional links you may find helpful:

Overview

GMX and WEB.DE are email clients of United Internet AG, one of Germany's leading Internet Service Provider (ISPs). Both include a freemail (ad-supported) and paid options for larger email needs.

You can find out more about these email clients here:

Nearly 54% of emails in Germany are opened in GMX or WEB.DE. If you're based in Germany, Austria, or Switzerland or you're mailing to subscribers based in those countries, then you'll definitely want to find out if your email is reaching the inbox.

Take Action

If your email is landing in spam, there are several things you can check. 1. Check the explanations of error messages to find out the specific reasons your email is being sent to the spam folder. You can find the explanations here:

2. Ensure you are complying with the sending policy and best practices. You can find these here:

3. Participate in the Certified Senders Alliance to help improve delivery and lower your chances of landing in the inbox.

Learn more

Here are some additional links you may find helpful:

GMX

Web.de

Overview

Mail.com is a free email service currently owned by a German internet company. Mail.com is unique in that it offers users multiple domains to create their email address. While there isn't a ton of published information from Mail.com on how their spam filters work, it does take into account sender reputation and other technical properties typical of spam. Users can also set their own personal spam filter functions and create their own whitelist and blacklist. Get more information about Mail.com spam blockers.

Take Action

To help your message avoid the spam folder, you can take several actions:

1. Make sure you're following Mail.com’s best practices and their email policy. Learn more:

2. Join the Certified Senders Alliance. Learn more:

3. Reach out to their MailSecurity team to troubleshoot.

Learn More

Here are some additional links you may find helpful:

Overview

Based in Russia, Mail.ru is a free webmail service and the largest email provider in the country. The Mail.ru inbox follows a very simple folder structure: Inbox, Sent, Draft, Spam, and Trash. Unlike other inbox providers, Mail.ru does not sort any incoming messages into different folders or tabs. But similar to other webmail services, Mail.ru uses a combination of anti-spam rules (including looking at content and sender reputation) and community feedback to determine and filter out spam messages.

Take Action

To help your message avoid the spam folder, you can take several actions:

  1. Make sure you're following the Mail.ru bulk email rules.
  2. Check your deliverability with Mail.ru by visiting their postmaster page and adding your domain.
  3. Send a message to the Mail.ru support team if your email is being marked as spam when it shouldn't be.

Learn More

For more information on spam and your users, check out our eBook, Adapting to Consumers' New Definition of Spam.

For more information on Mail.ru and how it renders your emails, check out this detailed blog post.

Overview

Yahoo Mail is a free consumer email service. Initially launched in 1997, Yahoo! Mail has a long history and enjoys great popularity. Yahoo! Mail combines user-provided spam reports with its own algorithms to identify and block suspected spam emails.

Take Action

If you've landed in the spam folder, you can:

1. Check you are following Yahoo's guidelines for bulk senders:

2. Troubleshoot issues, find policies, FAQs and more:

3. If you're having frequent issues delivering to Yahoo, sign up to their Complaint Feedback Loop program, which informs you when your email gets spam complaints:

Learn More

A Litmus guide to Yahoo:

Other deliverability resources

Overview

GoDaddy is a hosting provider that also offers a suite of software tools and services for users, including email. While previously GoDaddy had their own homegrown email solution with spam filtering, they have now migrated over to using Office 365 services.

Take Action

Since GoDaddy uses Office 365 services, you should use Office 365's troubleshooting guides. If your email lands in the spam folder consistently, here are some helpful tips:

1. If your mail has been rejected because of your sending IP address, go to the de-list portal to submit a de-listing request. Learn more:

2. Troubleshoot common deliverability problems with GoDaddy / Office 365. Learn more:

3. Ensure you are following Microsoft's policies, practices and guidelines. Learn more:

Learn More

Check out these helpful links below to learn more about Office 365 from GoDaddy:

Other deliverability resources

Overview

Office 365 is a set of cloud-based software and services Microsoft offers as a subscription to both consumers and businesses. The business version includes email services.

Many hosting providers (such as GoDaddy) are migrating their homegrown email solutions over to Office 365 and are now using the same spam filtering services. The good news is that if you are able to correct any issues causing your email to go to spam in Office 365, you may also find that you are no longer caught in spam for those other services.

Take Action

Office 365 provides several troubleshooting options to senders: 1. If your mail has been rejected because of your sending IP address, go to the de-list portal to submit a de-listing request. Learn more:

2. If you’re not sure what's going wrong, troubleshoot common problems with Office 365. Learn more:

3. Ensure you are following Microsoft's policies, practices and guidelines. Learn more:

Learn More

Check out these helpful links below to learn more about Office 365:

Overview

A domain blocklist (DBL) is a real-time collection of sending domains that could indicate spam or other types of email abuse.

Domain blocklists are more commonly known as blacklists. Blacklists may utilize a combination of spam traps, spam complaints, and other proprietary data sources as criteria for adding a domain to a blocklist.

Inbox providers maintain internal blocklists, as well as use third-party blacklists as independent data sources.

How can we help?

Litmus scans your domain against various blacklists and will indicate whether or not your domain is listed at time of send.

Not all blacklists carry the same level of trustworthiness or adoption. Litmus will alert you based on the level of importance or potential impact.

Impact

The impact a blacklist or blocklist has on your email delivery can vary depending on the list. To help you prioritize your efforts, we’ve included an impact flag, which indicates how damaging a listing could be for your email delivery.

A high impact listing indicates a widely used blacklist or blocklist that will cause your email to be blocked at one or more major email providers. A low impact listing, by contrast, may impact your overall email delivery, but most likely on a lower scale.

Take Action

If you find your domain on a blocklist, the most common reason is a bad source of data, user complaints or hitting a spam trap.

Learn More

1. Avoid spam traps.Spam traps are commonly used by blacklist providers to catch malicious senders, but often, legitimate senders with poor data hygiene or acquisition practices get caught in a spam trap. Learn more:

2. Check out these other deliverability resources:

NoSolicitado – Help

Your address email.litmus.com is listed on the NoSolicitado blacklist.

Overview

An IP-based blocklist is a real-time collection of sending IPs that could indicate spam/other types of email abuse.

"IPs" refers to IP addresses, which is a number that uniquely identifies any device connected to the internet. "IP" stands for "Internet Protocol." Similar to how a street address helps people find buildings, an IP Address helps computers find each other on the internet. Sending IPs can indicate who or what device sent a particular email communication.

Blocklists are more commonly referred to as blacklists. Blacklists may utilize a combination of spam traps, spam complaints, and other proprietary data sources as criteria for adding an IP to a blacklist. Inbox providers maintain proprietary blocklists, as well as using independent, third-party blacklists.

How can we help?

Litmus scans your IP against various blacklists, indicating if your IP is listed at time of send. Not all blacklists carry the same level of trustworthiness or adoption. Litmus will alert you based on the level of importance or possible impact.

Impact

The impact a blacklist or blocklist has on your email delivery can vary depending on the list. To help you prioritize your efforts, we’ve included an impact flag, which indicates how damaging a listing could be for your email delivery.

A high impact listing indicates a widely used blacklist or blocklist that will cause your email to be blocked at one or more major email providers. A low impact listing, by contrast, may impact your overall email delivery, but most likely on a lower scale.

Take Action

If you have found yourself on a blacklist, the most common reason is a bad source of data, user complaints, or hitting a spam trap.

Learn More

1. Avoid spam traps. Spam traps are commonly used by blacklist providers to catch malicious senders, but often, legitimate senders with poor data hygiene or acquisition practices end up on the radar as well. Learn more:

2. Check out these other deliverability resources: