2015-state-of-email

2015 State of Email: The Email Marketer’s Guide to Creating Successful Campaigns

The email landscape is constantly changing. Between the introduction of new anti-spam laws, more email apps, and new iPhones, email marketing has never presented more challenges—or opportunities. As an email marketer focused on success, it’s crucial to stay on top of every new development. In our 2015 State of Email Report, we analyze the biggest email developments and provide tons of actionable tips to keep you on top of your game.

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Use Testing to Continuously Learn More About Your Audience

Through testing, you can gain insights into your subscribers and their preferences that help you send strategic, optimized, and better-performing campaigns. The team over at Emerson, a manufacturing and technology company, wanted to generate interest in their product by offering a free trial via email. While they knew their B2B audience consisted mostly of conservative, middle-aged engineers, they were unsure which type of offer would resonate best—and ultimately produce the most leads. So, they set out to test…and test…and test again!

 

53% of Emails Opened on Mobile; Outlook Opens Decrease 33%

We’ve been tracking email opens for more than 4 years. And it’s incredible to see how behaviors have changed over time. Mobile email was barely a blip on our radars in 2011, and made up just 8% of email opens. Fast forward to 2014, and nearly half of emails are opened on smartphones and tablets—a 500% increase in four years.

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Where Should You Focus Your Testing Efforts?

Between buggy support for HTML and CSS, spelling errors, bad links, missing images, and other potential blunders, it’s crucial to test your email campaigns before every single send. But, where should you focus your testing efforts? With so many email apps available (not to mention the different versions of each), it’s easy to feel overwhelmed trying to test every possible combination. Looking at open data for your audience is the key to narrowing down where you should be focusing your testing efforts.